Saturday, April 28, 2007

Mondo Pakistani


Most shot-on-video zombie flicks are real pieces of shit, so it's refreshing when a non-corn laced turdlet drops from the rotted anus of undead-filmdom. This potential piece of creamy goodness is former film critic, and cult film encyclopedia, Omar Khan's Hell's Ground (Zibahkhana), Pakistan's "first gore film". Their myspace page sums it up as so:

ZIBAHKHANA/HELL'S GROUND is the first modern horror film to be shot in Pakistan. It breaks all of the rules of local productions and was made entirely independently with no film industry or government assistance.

In the spirit of the old EC comics, the film tells the story of five teens who get lost on their way to a rock concert, are menaced by flesh eating mutations and then fall into the clutches of a family of back woods killers. The film includes copious amounts of gore alongside a splattering of social commentary and several slices of dark humour. It's best seen as a tribute to the cinema of Lucio Fulci and George Romero, but viewed from a distinctly Pakistani perspective.

The film is directed and co-written by former film critic Omar Ali Khan. Its cast combines some of the country's most exciting new talent alongside Pakistani film veterans such as Rehan and Najma Malik. The gruesome make up effects were done by Nawab Sagar, another industry veteran who has worked on numerous mainstream productions. The film was shot by London trained cinematographer Najaf Bilgrami and was edited by the UK's Andy Starke.

Early word is that Khan and his team nailed a Mystics in Bali meets Fulci feel for the flick, so we can hope for the goods. Meanwhile, you can visit them here:
http://www.myspace.com/hellsgroundmovie

And check out the trailer:

Thursday, April 26, 2007

Are you ready for Freddy


More from my recent slasher/horror kick. After watching the classic Dream Warriors the other night, I decided to go back and check out the recent Infinifilm DVD of the original Nightmare on Elm Street, which I hadn't seen in a good five years. It was interesting to watch how much the series differs when under Craven's control; the dreamscapes that Freddy takes his victims through are less cartooney, and more surreal, capturing that helpless feeling you often have in a nightmare. Even Kruger's humor carries a vulgar, disturbing edge to it, rather than featuring, say, a dog pissing fire (Part 4). The only Elm Streeter that comes close to what's featured here is New Nightmare, which Craven claims is the only Freddy follow-up that goes in line with his original intentions.

And off that, here are some of Freddy's best moments, backed by The Fat Boys' "Are You Ready For Freddy":

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

I'm a big chicken-shit


Anyone who loves a good scary-as-shit ghost story, or just a plain old good story, should do themselves a favor and pick up Joe Hill's debut novel Heart-Shaped Box. Forget the hype, and that Hill is the son of Stephen King, this book has all the urgency and excitement of a young gun running off pure inspiration, with the structure and character work of an old-hand. Even dear old dad's debut wasn't this hot. Kept my ass awake long after I'd put it down.

Check it all out here:
www.joehillfiction.com

Yo, Freddy! Where you hiding at, you burnt-faced pussy?


Another night, another 80's horror flick with a hair metal sing-a-long theme song. This time it was A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors, possibly the best of the Freddy sequels, which not only features one of slasher cinema's greatest heroes in Roland "I ain't wanna sleep no more" Kincaid, but a little ditty from Dokken.

Monday, April 23, 2007

He's Back


Last night was Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives! One of the best in the series, along with parts one and four, and one of the wittiest slashers flicks out there, thanks to the script/directing work of Amazing Stories vet Tom McLoughlin.

Of course, this is the real reason to see it:

Friday, April 13, 2007

I'm So Horny

In honor of Friday the 13th:

Crispin Glover in Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter

Violence Action


A relic of V-Cinema's past, with a focus on "hard-boiled actor" Makoto Sawamura.